How To Choose Clothing For The Deceased

How To Choose Clothing For The Deceased

You can choose to dress the body in new clothes that you’ve purchased or clothes that the person who died already owned.

When thinking about how to dress the person, consider what he or she would have liked to have been buried in, such as a favorite or special outfit. While many people are buried in formal attire, feel free to dress the person in any outfits they might have loved, such as a favorite pair of jeans, a lucky hat, or a beloved piece of jewelry.

Religious Considerations

If the funeral will be following any religious or cultural customs, the clothing might be dictated by those rules. Speak to your local religious leaders to learn more about your religion’s customs, or see our article Religious Funeral Traditions.

Items To Bring For The Deceased

If the person who died will be buried or cremated with personal items, you’ll want to gather those items before the service and bring them with you to the funeral home before the service or to the funeral service itself. There are no rules or regulations on what a person can or cannot be buried with. Common personal possessions that people are buried with include:

  • Family photographs
  • Favorite jewelry
  • Bibles or other favorite books
  • Other sentimental items

If the body will be cremated, remember that all metal must be removed from the body prior to cremation. This includes jewelry, piercings, and belt buckles, which you may have to remove from the body before the cremation.

The 7 Most Baffling Things About Women’s Clothes

There are a lot of annoying things about being a woman, like periods, childbirth and not being able to play basketball in a way that keeps spectators awake. But near the top of the list has got to be buying clothes.

I know one way to fix it is just to be ballsy and wear men’s clothes, and that’s a bold choice. But you take a social hit for wearing “masculine” clothes, and most women don’t want to take that hit. So they go to buy clothes made specifically “for women,” and generally find a set of the most impractical, low-quality, high-maintenance crap that a sweatshop can make.

Here are a few of the many, many awful things about the clothes that manufacturers want women to wear:

#7. The Material Is Too Thin

Go through any women’s clothes section and put your hand inside all the shirts and dresses and see if you can see it. (If you are a man, try to make sure no one is looking first.) About 50 percent of the time, you are going to get a pretty good view of your hand. And you don’t have to go to a fancy boutique; this holds true for my neighborhood Target.

That means if a girl wears just that shirt, you are going to see her bra, or even boobs, which I’m sure sounds exciting and positive to many men, but violates workplace and school dress codes, as well as many public decency laws. Also, these are clothes for all women of all ages, not just young, attractive women.

This isn’t a mistake. The solution is supposed to be layering, which has really caught on in recent years. All of these stores also sell plenty of tank tops, camisoles and plain form-fitting T-shirts, sometimes dedicating entire sections to clothes specifically designed for use in layering. Catalog photos will often show girls wearing three or more layers.

I can’t prove they do this deliberately to make women buy more pieces of clothing, but once you found you could sell this concept to people, why wouldn’t you? Someone who used to buy one shirt is now going to buy three from you. And you get to use less material.

On top of that, super-thin cloth isn’t very durable, and its evil cousin, the lacy sweater with huge holes, easily catches and tears in a washing machine. So you get to spend even more money replacing them more often or dry cleaning them.

#6. Fake Pockets or No Pockets

One thing I think a lot of men take for granted is pockets. It seems like men always have pockets. They’re a requirement in men’s pants, men’s coats always have functional pockets and I guess even men’s prison jumpsuits must have them, since I hear about people smuggling goods into prison all the time.

Women’s clothing manufacturers, on the other hand, seem to believe women can’t be trusted with pockets. Something like 99 percent of dresses have no pockets at all, and the more formal you get, the more likely a women’s coat or pants pocket is going to be a fake, decorative pocket.

I know the arguments — “But women’s clothes are so carefully cut and tailored. If you put anything in a pocket, it would bulge and look bad!” That’s bullshit. I just went to the store with my bridesmaids and picked out some bridesmaids’ dresses with pockets.

Sure, there will be unsightly bulges if they put too much in their pockets, but the solution isn’t to take them away — the solution is to trust women to have the common sense to not put a bag of rocks in their pocket. These pockets are just fine for carrying a key or some cash or credit cards, and it’s stupid to not give anyone that option because some idiot might try to put, I don’t know, night-vision goggles or a piece of cake in their pocket.

But it’s OK, because instead of functional pockets, we get a ton of decorative pockets, as well as numerous other nonfunctional decorations, like extra buttons, and buckles, and flaps. Look at these ridiculous boots.

Sure has a lot of buckles and stitching and all that, I bet these must be complex to put on. Oh wait.

It’s just one zipper up the inside.

The only possible conclusion is that Rob “Pouches” Liefeld moonlights as a women’s clothing designer in his spare time.

#5. Too Cold

Another problem is that women’s clothes are too damn cold. Part of it is the thinness of much of the material, as mentioned before, but no matter how thick the material, many, many styles involve increasing exposure, like dipped necklines, three-quarter sleeves or skirts and dresses.

It can be easy to chalk this up just to women who dress “provocatively,” but the truth is that a fairly normal, unprovocative women’s style exposes a lot more skin than men’s clothes. A below-knee skirt still exposes your shins. A three-quarter sleeve isn’t terribly provocative unless you have a thing for forearms. And necklines don’t need to go anywhere near the boobs to still be a lot wider than the average men’s neckline.

The obvious question, which might come up on a bunch of these points, is why we don’t just avoid these styles. It’s harder than it sounds, because they’re everywhere. It can be hard to find a shirt with a neckline between “look at my bust” and turtleneck, and when you do, it turns out to be a three-quarter sleeve. If you find a dress with full sleeves, they’ve pulled the hem up to your ass.

What makes this all worse is that this is almost inevitably the case with all “professional” styles that are OK to wear at the office, and women being cold at the office is an enormous, widespread workplace issue, as I’ve covered before.

I don’t think colder clothing is the cause, as bundled-up women complain of the cold just as much. I think it’s just adding insult to injury that they’re already feeling cold, and that there is no “professional”-looking outfit that will let them bundle up properly without looking like they are in a Christmas special.

#4. Arbitrary Clothing Sizes

Men’s pants sizes are logical and come in measurements of at least waist size, and often inseam, too. Women’s pants sizes, and clothing sizes in general, are meaningless, arbitrary numbers that come, as far as I can tell, from having kittens bat around a 20-sided die.

This isn’t just a recent trend. Women’s clothing manufacturers have been making up sizes as far back as sizes have existed. According to one fashion historian, a 32-inch bust would have come out to a size 14 in a 1937 Sears catalog, while being labeled a size 8 in 1967, and coming down to a size 0 in today’s terms.

Even today, you apparently inflate and deflate like a balloon when you go from brand to brand, according to their sizes. A woman who is size 6 at American Eagle might be a 0 at Ann Taylor, as mentioned in the above article.

Obviously they’re pandering here, trying to flatter women by making them sound thinner with a skinny-sounding number, because when you make people feel good, they buy things. As long as the market keeps rewarding for it, they’ll keep doing it, so I guess there’s no hope for making women’s sizes any easier to buy.

On the other hand, if we can’t make things easier for women, apparently they are making things harder for men these days by doing the same thing with their pants. According to Esquire, various brands of men’s pants labeled as having a “36-inch waist” actually had waistlines ranging from 36 to 41 inches (Old Navy was the fattest liar). In an era where action heroes can no longer sport beer bellies (John Wayne, young Captain Kirk), I guess men need flattery about their waistlines, too.

In attempting equality, I would have preferred making pants-buying easier and more consistent for everybody instead of making it suck for everybody but I guess that’s the way they decided to go.

#3. There’s No Such Thing as a “Regular” T-Shirt

Men like to use T-shirts as billboards to show everyone what their favorite band, or team, or joke is, and when they see a T-shirt with the perfect saying on it, they just need to pick a size and buy it. Women also like to make similar statements with T-shirts, but it’s not that easy.

Women’s torsos can be a myriad of different shapes, not just for obvious reasons (boobs), but for waist-to-hip ratio and torso length as well. And women’s clothes, while not all skintight, are expected to be at least semi-fitted — to at least tuck in somewhat below the bust.

The fit isn’t just about bust size, but how far down the boobs are as well. As such, you can find something that fits your bust size but expects them to be lower/higher than they are, or it can fit both of those things, but be too short for your long torso.

So the end result is that if you find, say, a Dethklok women’s T-shirt with the perfect, most metal design, odds are that size small will cut off above your belly button and size large will fit two of you, or you’ll have to bind your chest to wear it, or some other mismatch. Or even worse, they’ve put a weird V-neck on it or freakishly short sleeves, or some other attempt at making it “fashionable” and “feminine.”

You can buy a men’s shirt instead, but if you have any kind of figure, it will either hang like a tent or be too snug on one end of the hourglass or the other.

The end result of all this is that because of the good cut, I end up wearing my World of Warcraft T-shirts a lot even though I don’t play the game anymore and am honestly a little embarrassed.

#2. Clothes That Need Instructions

One thing I’m pretty sure men don’t have to ask when clothes shopping is, “Is this supposed to be a long shirt, or a short dress?” This is a common question for many women. If you’re at a department store, you might be lucky enough to see it printed on the price tag, but if not, good luck. Other pieces of clothing that can be confused are tube tops and short skirts, leg warmers and arm warmers, and whether something is supposed to be pajamas or not.

Even if you technically know what something is, like a wrap sweater, that doesn’t mean you know how to wear it. If you didn’t know anything about wrap sweaters, how would you think you’re supposed to wear this?

#1. There’s No Such Thing as “Regular” Clothes

“Well, sure, all that might be a problem if you are always shopping for fashionable, fancy clothes,” you might say. “You should just go to a regular store and buy normal, not-fancy clothes.” The problem is that they’ve almost stopped making normal, not-fancy clothes.

Remember Gap? It used to be known as a store where you could buy dependable, boring staples like jeans, sweatshirts and plain T-shirts. If anyone remembers that Gap, they wouldn’t recognize it today. Looking for a nice, regular long-sleeve shirt? How about an upside-down drawstring garbage bag with a giant V cut into the neckline?

The problem is that women’s fashion has to change every year, preferably to some type of clothes that haven’t existed before, because the economic model of women’s clothes depends on at least a certain group of women buying new clothes every year, which they are less likely to do if the fashions haven’t changed.

Unfortunately, all the good styles have already been invented, which means that in order to come out with something that’s never been done before, it has to be retarded and look bad on most women. Sometimes they can be lazy and bring back an old style, like with the recent ’80s revival, but designers do put their own stamp on it to make it technically new, and usually more ugly and inconvenient (a fine feat with ’80s wear). Making the material thinner is always a great trick.

And for some reason, more and more staid, dependable, “regular” clothes stores like Gap and Target are trying to capture the “fashionable” market by carrying more of these stupid short-lived fad trends and less of the timeless, washable styles. When I go in to replace my leggings or skirt, all I find are goddamned jeggings and bubble skirts, which must have been created on a dare because nobody looks good in them.

How to Save Money on Clothes

So, the last time you went shopping you ended up spending all your money and were really regretting it. This happens to almost everyone especially if a person is a shopaholic. Every time you decide you will not spend much money on clothes you do the opposite. But saving money on clothes is not that difficult. Read on to know how.

Steps

1. Avoid credit cards. If you cannot control yourself while you are shopping and buy almost everything that comes into your sight then avoid taking credit cards with you while shopping. Shop with cash so that you can spend limited amount of money.
2. Make a list. Planning always works and does wonders when you are shopping. Before going to the mall just think and prepare a list about what kind of clothes you need and try to buy that only and not anything else.
3. Look for good bargains. It is better if you wait for the sales and good deals which offer you good clothes without taking much money from you. You can check out online deals, or look for sale advertisements in newspapers.
4. Shop in advance. This is definitely one good trick which should be followed. If you shop for the next season before it starts you will save a lot of money.
5. Buy what you require not what you want. We love to shop and want a lot of clothes but most of the times it is better to check your wardrobe and see what you require than what you want. If winter is around the corner don’t buy clothes for the summer just because they are trendy. Buy clothes needed for winter. You can buy clothes for summer when the winter is about to end.
6. Build a good wardrobe. Having a nice wardrobe which has a lot of variety in dress is quite difficult, so you can take a little help from your friends and family. Fill your wardrobe with a variety of colors and different types of clothes.
7. Shop smartly. Buy items that go with more than 2 or 3 of your clothes, which allows you to change your look without buying different items for each of your dress.
8. Buy accessories. Buy some nice jewelry that go with your clothes. They make your clothes more attractive and you won’t have to spend much money on it.
9. Be focused. No matter how hard you try to save money on clothes you need to remember why you are doing it. It might be because you want to save your pocket money or you don’t get money for other stuff. So, keep reminding yourself why you need to save money as this helps in making your self control much more better .
10. Buy online. You can buy cheaper online, what’s more, go to get a coupon code for your purchase. Don’t be impetuous.

How to Shop for Clothes Online

Online shopping can save you time, money, and a trip to the mall, but reckless online shopping can actually end up causing you problems. When you buy clothes online, make sure you buy the clothing you need in the correct sizes. Shop around to find the best prices, and keep your guard up to avoid scams and disreputable sellers.

Method 1 of 3: Buying the Right Clothes

1. Take your measurements. Each manufacturer may size clothing differently, so you cannot rely on a standard small/medium/large scale or numeric size scales. Since you cannot try on clothes before you buy them when shopping online, accurate measurements are essential.

  • At minimum, women should know their bust, waist, and hip measurements. Additional measurements, such as height, inseam, and arm length, may also be needed depending on the garment being purchased.
  • Men should know their chest, neck, waist, and inseam measurements. Additional measurements, including arm length, shoulder width, and height may also be needed.
  • For children’s clothing, parents should know their child’s height, waist, and hips. Girls also need a bust measurement, and boys need a chest measurement.
  • For newborns and toddlers, parents should know their child’s height and weight.
  • Also, know the season you’re shopping for. For many of us, summer time is all about living easy and enthralling in the warm weather. Whenever warm weather is upon us, women decide to mix things up a bit and go out wearing shorts. In the fall, long blue jeans make your body warmer. So know the season you’re shopping for.
2. Check each garment’s sizing information. Most manufacturers have a standard sizing chart they use for all their clothing, but many online stores sell items from a range of manufacturers. Check the product description of each garment you consider purchasing to double-check how the sizes are measured. You may discover that you are a small by one manufacturer’s standard, but a medium by another’s standard.
3. Make a list of what you need. If you decide to shop for multiple items of clothing at once, write down everything you need before you get started. Doing so will help you stay on track and may help prevent you from feeling overwhelmed by choices. Depending on where you’re located, many seem to flock to Amazon or Wal-Mart because the price meets the demand. If in Europe or the Middle East, the Amazon alternative is Jumia. In Russia, it’s completely different than Middle Eastern or South American countries, and so forth. So really narrow your search down after finding which sites will offer your clothing based off location.
4. Avoid distractions. Only look at the clothes you know you need. If you only intend to buy a new dress, avoid looking at tops and accessories. Otherwise, you risk wasting time looking at clothes you don’t really need, and may end up buying something extra and out of budget.
5. Try on your clothes as soon as they arrive. Many online stores accept returns, but only within a limited time frame. Try on your clothes as soon as they arrive at your door. Do not remove any tags or stickers, since doing so may hinder your ability to return the item if it does not fit.
Method 2 of 3: Staying within Budget
1. Set a budget. In order to avoid over-spending, you need to know how much you can afford to spend. Review your financial situation and determine how much extra money you have available.
2. Shop around. The true beauty of online shopping is convenience. Within minutes, you can check out the selection at multiple stores, all without leaving your chair. Take advantage of this convenience by comparing the prices and selection offered by several reputable online stores. You may discover that two stores are offering similar garments for vastly different prices.
3. Search for deals. The easiest way to do this is to sign up for email newsletters with various online stores you frequent. These newsletters frequently include information about sales and clearances. Otherwise, quickly visit the online storefronts of different sellers and note which ones have sales going on.
4. Shop wholesale. Many wholesale sellers require you to be a reseller to make a purchase, but not all do.

  • True wholesale requires you to purchase large quantities at one time, making it a good option for basic necessities like underwear and socks.
  • Retail wholesalers purchase large quantities of clothing at wholesale prices, then sell those garments with very little mark-up. As a result, clothing purchased from a retail wholesaler is often much cheaper than clothing purchased from a standard retailer.
5. Check shipping costs before you commit. Shipping costs and additional check-out fees can dramatically drive up the price of your purchase, especially if you end up buying from a seller in a foreign country.

  • You should also make these costs a factor when you compare prices at various stores.

Method 3 of 3: Keeping Yourself Safe

1. Buy from trusted sellers. Department store websites and the official websites of well-known brands are a good place to start. If you buy from smaller stores or individual sellers, opt for sellers that go through PayPal or other secure payment methods.
2. Look for comments and reviews. Only purchase from individual sellers when a detailed feedback system is available. Sellers with a 100% approval rating may be skewing their results, so you should aim for sellers who have vastly positive reviews and a few “resolved” negatives. Resolved negatives include any problem that was remedied after communication between the buyer and seller.
3. Know how to spot a counterfeit. When buying brand name items, be aware of the fact that many sellers are out to scam you. Know the peculiarities of a particular brand and look for detailed pictures that can be used to identify a garment as real or fake.
4. Do not give out personal information. Your name and address are necessary, but your Social Security number and bank account are not. If a feel skeptical about whether or not a seller is asking for unnecessary personal information, err on the side of safety.
5. Shop on encrypted websites. Websites that start with “https://” are secured, and many Internet browsers also display a closed padlock to indicate encrypted security. These security measures are not necessary while viewing products, but you should avoid websites that have you pay on unsecured pages.
6. Check out the return policy. Before you commit to a purchase, verify whether or not a seller offers returns and refunds. Even a legitimate seller who does not offer returns can be a mistake to buy from, since you may find yourself stuck with an unusable product if it does not fit.